Various Carry On Luggage Sizes

I  can’t cover all of the airlines, but I think this should give you a good idea of the average free checked luggage allowances.  Presumptions: flight from USA and on an economy ticket.  You can also find this on the website.

Airline Size Number Weight
China Southern 20×40×55 1 Piece 11 lbs
American Airlines 35 inches; 45 inches 1 Personal item; 1 Carry On
United Airlines 9x14x22 inches; 9x10x17 inches 1 Carry On; 1 Personal Item
Delta Airlines 45 inches total 1 Carry On; 1 Personal Item
Emirates 22 x 15 x 8 inches 1 Personal Item 15 lbs
Southwestern Airlines 10 x 16 x 24 inches 1 Carry On; 1 Personal Item
Lufthansa 21x15x9 inches 1 Carry On 17 lbs
Air China 21x15x7 inches 1 Carry On 11 lbs
Air France 21x13x9 inches 1 Carry On; 1 Personal Item 26.5 lbs
British Airways 22x18x10 inches; 18x14x8 inches 1 Carry On; 1 Personal Item 50 lbs

 

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Various Checked Luggage Sizes

I  can’t cover all of the airlines, but I think this should give you a good idea of the average free checked luggage allowances.  One thing that appears to be consistent- 62 inches total size around. Presumptions: flight from USA and on an economy ticket.

Airline Size Free Pieces Weight
China Southern 62 Inches Total 2 Pieces 50 lbs
American Airlines 62 Inches Total 2 Pieces 50 lbs
United Airlines 62 Inches Total 0 Pieces 50 lbs
Delta Airlines 62 Inches Total 1 Piece 50 lbs
Emirates 62 Inches Total 2 Pieces 50 lbs
Southwestern Airlines 62 Inches Total 2 Pieces 50 lbs
Lufthansa 62 Inches Total 1 Pieces 50 lbs
Air China 62 Inches Total 2 Pieces 50 lbs
Air France 62 Inches Total 1 Pieces 50 lbs
British Airways 81 Inches Total 1 Pieces 51 lbs

“American, US Airways Tweak Fees, Mileage Rules”

“American, US Airways Tweak Fees, Mileage Rules”

by David Koenig via “AP

FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011, file photo, a passenger walks through an American Airlines baggage claim area at O'Hare International Airport...

“DALLAS (AP) — If you use miles to get a free ticket on American Airlines, you may have to pay to check that suitcase.

 American and US Airways announced changes Tuesday to their policies on checked-bag fees and redeeming miles for free flights.

Passengers traveling on American on miles they earned or who paid full price for an economy seat won’t get free checked bags anymore. Some elite-level frequent fliers on both airlines will get one less free bag than before.

When it comes to redeeming miles for free flights, US Airways is ending blackout days. American will change the number of miles to get an unrestricted free flight — more on popular travel days, fewer on less-busy ones. And it’s making an array of changes to the miles needed for international trips.

Suzanne Rubin, an American Airlines vice president who oversees the AAdvantage loyalty program, said the changes will increase revenue but she declined to give a figure.

The two carriers merged in December and formed American Airlines Group Inc., and Tuesday’s changes are designed to bring the policies of the two closer together. Between them, they have 110 million loyalty-program members, Rubin said.

Other changes:

— For U.S. travel on or after June 1, American members can redeem miles for an unrestricted “AAnytime” award at 20,000 miles, 30,000 miles or 50,000 each way instead of the current 25,000-mile flat rate. The less-flexible “MileSAAver” awards will continue to start at 12,500 miles.

— Mid-tier elite members (platinum on American; gold and platinum on US Airways) will get two free checked bags; a reduction of one for the US Airways’ Dividend Miles elites.

— Lower-level elites (gold on American; silver on US Airways) will get one free checked bag, a reduction from two for the American customers.

— Removing a charge for second checked bags on trips to South America.

Rubin said the company was not considering charging a fee for carry-on bags, as Spirit Airlines does. . . . .”

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“50 Travel Tips You Must Know Before You Go: Phil Tripp’s Top Tips”

“50 Travel Tips You Must Know Before You Go: Phil Tripp’s Top Tips”

by Phil Tripp via “The Australian

World traveller Phil Tripp has shared his advice.

Why the women’s wear?

It’s not a case of cross dressing. It’s just common sense for any man travelling with a female travel companion, in case of lost luggage.

And no, it doesn’t mean the female counterpart gets to fill her own luggage AND half her fella’s suitcase too.

She should carry a few changes of clothes for her partner in her luggage, too.

That way, if one piece of luggage is lost or delayed, both travellers will always have something to wear. . . . “