Common Study Abroad Expenses

Your first step in estimating expenses is to determine what is included in the Program’s Package.  The school/organization will give you a price that you have to pay to them, and what is provided through that package varies from program to program.  Usually, it will include tuition, housing, a certain number of “culture trips” (may be extra!), transportation between hotel and school morning and afternoon (for short programs), VISA (may be extra!), and the assistance of a program advisor.

Some things to verify include:

  • Transportation Fees – does this include flights, trips to and from the school and hotel, trips to internships, extra trips offered during the program, etc.
  • Housing Fees – Is there a deposit required by the hotel? What amenities are provided by the hotel? Is breakfast offered? What about a gym or exercise facilities? Is there a mini kitchen in the room or are you required to eat out?  How about laundry facilities? An iron? Wireless? How many people in a room? 
  • Program Fees – Are all culture trips included in this price? Books? Exam software or notebooks? Transcripts?  All classroom expenses?
  • Flights – If flights are included, how many suitcases do you get free?
  • VISA – Is the VISA included or are you getting that on your own (this is important for your time considerations as well- VISA can take weeks to obtain)?
  • Books  – Are they included?

In addition to the fees required by the school, you will have a number of out-of-pocket expenses. Many of these will depend on your own choices (e.g. shared or private rooms), but certainly some of them are requisite no matter what.  A great place to find information on living expenses is Numbeo’s “Cost of Living” site or try googleing “Cost of Living in . . . . “

Below, I have attempted to list the most common expenses study abroadists face during the trip.

These costs naturally vary student-to-student, place-to-place so this is not a hard&fast list of expenses. Some of us will spend less, some more. But at least it gives you something to work from!

**[PP] = Usually included in the overall price of the program listed by the school

  • Tuition (???) – Depends on the school, location, and length of the program [PP]
  • Flights (approximately $600-$2500 one-way) – shop early, plan well. 
    • Airline Baggage Fees (US-Foreign Country = 2 free bags, then $75-$150 for the third one) – if you are flying internationally between other countries, this cost may change!).  Remember to book all you tickets at once or you might be charged for each bag on any domestic flights included in the trip. Also don’t have overweight luggage!
    • Layover Fees ($0 – $300) – Some flights involve layover delays in between each flight. Sometimes people end up spending money on food, drinks, entertainment, souvenirs, short tours of the layover stop, hotels, taxis, etc.  To avoid these extra costs, bring a book or tablet with you on the trip, take a bus if you leave the airport, and sleep in the airport if allowed.
  • Housing (usually around $1000-$1500 / month) [PP] – usually required even for home-stays.
    • Hotel Deposit ($70-$200) – Not always necessary – if required, must be paid upon arrival at the hotel. Usually will be included towards the cost of the hotel room.
    • Alternative would be finding a hostel (average $15-$50/night) or staying with someone you know.
    • Costs for Hotel Amenities (Gym, Trash, Wireless, Recycling, Laundry, Dry-Cleaning, House-Keeping, etc.) are sometimes not included in given hotel fee.  Ask your program director what is and is not included.
  • VISA ($0-$500) – Usually free if you stay less than 90 days. [PP]
    • If you do require a VISA and you have to get your own, it may require traveling to a major city to the nation’s embassy twice (once to drop off paperwork and once to pick up the VISA). This often adds an extra hotel and transportation cost for the trip.
  • US Passport ($135) – ALWAYS required. Check out our Passport page for more information.
  • Textbooks ($60-???) – Depends on your program, classes, etc.
  • Transportation ($100-???) – Costs can run at very small if you mostly walk to pretty high if you take taxis or have to pay extra money for culture trips or tours. Walk, Bike, or take a Bus if you can.  Save a minimum $100 just in case!
  • Food ($100-$1000/month) – Depends on location, length of program, and what you eat.  Can range from minor amounts to extremely costly.  To save money try cooking for yourself (especially in the hotel has a kitchenette), eating on the street, or finding restaurants that serve the local workers. Avoid cafes, nicer dinner establishments, or tourist shops.  Organic or Vegetarian options often cost more.  You can always bring a tub of peanut butter and live on sandwiches or bring some boxes of Mac&Cheese!  Not to say you can’t taste some good traditional cuisine! Yummy 🙂
  • Excursions ($50-$200/week w/ $300-$400 for one weekend away trip) – We all want to visit the cultural sites and stop off at a good club now and again.  Try to set aside $50-$200/week (more or less depending on what you’re doing), and spread out the costlier places over the duration of the trip.  I’ve never seen a student manage a study abroad trip without at least one major trip to a different country or city, so save $300-$400 for that one weekend traveling expedition.
  • Souvenirs ($100-$250) – You may not spend it all, or you might spend more. But I’d try to set aside this amount as your base.
  • Clothing ($100-???) – Entirely up to you!  But at least $100 in case you find a t-shirt or jewelry or a hat or something.
  • Suitcases ($100-$150 each) 
  • Common Surprise Extras
    • Medication (for the whole time)
    • Iron (if you have a suit) or Dry-Cleaning
    • Laundry 
    • Internet (if you don’t have wi-fi, you can sometimes rent a router)
    • Phone Service (a lot of international travelers rent a phone and plan for their trip)
    • Insurance (Health and Renters)
    • Gym / Exercise
    • Kitchen Appliances for the room
    • Living Supplies (shampoo, conditioner, soaps, dish soap, blankets, towels, hair dryers, plates, trash bags, etc.)
    • Clothing (emergency shirts, pants, suits, shoes, hair things, hats, etc. – you packed for hot and it’s cold, you packed for hiking and you suddenly have an internship with a company.
    • Doctor’s Bills – food poisoning, broken bones, etc.
    • Appliances – extension cords, adapters, chargers, padlocks, etc.
    • School Supplies – pencils, notebooks, etc.

So What About You?  Any Costs You’d Add To The List?

2015-2016 FAFSA School Code List

I have officially modified the website according to the 2015-2016 FAFSA School Code List.  All the links have been modified, and the list of schools and universities has been updated.  

You should take note of the changes, and verify that any school you are interested in is still there. More schools are gone this year than I’ve ever seen before, but there are some good ones added.

Gone:

  • Australian Catholic University (Australia)
  • Avondale College Limited (Australia)
  • Curtin University of Technology (Australia)
  • Deakin University (Australia)
  • Northern Territory University (Australia)
  • Queensland University of Technology (Australia)
  • Swinburne University of Technology (Australia)
  • University of Newcastle (Australia)
  • University of Southern Australia (Australia)
  • University of Western Sydney (Australia)
  • Victoria University of Technology (Australia)
  • Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium)
  • Canadian Southern Baptist Seminary (Canada)
  • Capilano University (Canada)
  • Institute for Christian Studies (Canada)
  • McMaster University (Canada)
  • Medicine Hat College (Canada)
  • Nova Scotia College of Art & Design (Canada)
  • Rocky Mountain College (Canada)
  • Trent University (Canada)
  • University of Lethbridge (Canada)
  • University of Waterloo (Canada)
  • 3rd Faculty of Medice, Charles University (Czech Republic)
  • University of Cambridge-New Hall (England)
  • University of Szeged Faculty of Medicine (Hungary)
  • Pontifical North American College (Italy)
  • Pontificia Universita Gregoriana (Italy)
  • Pontificia University San Tommaso (Italy)
  • Universidad de Guanajuato (Mexico)
  • Autonomous University of Tamaulipas (Mexico)
  • University of Waikato
  • University of Bergen (Norway)
  • University of Oslo (Norway)
  • Escuela Superior Administracion y Direccion de Empresas (Spain)
  • Karolinska Institutet (Sweden)
  • Nyenrode Business Universiteit (Netherlands)
  • University of Glamorgan (Wales)

 

New

  • Masarykova Univerzita (Czech Republic)
  • Norwich University of the Arts (England)
  • Regent’s University London (England)
  • University of Chester (England)
  • University of West London (England)
  • Cork Institute of Technology (Ireland)
  • Universidad del Noreste (Mexico)
  • Universidad de la Salle Bajio (Mexico)
  • Medical University of the Americas (St. Kitts-Nevis)
  • University of South Wales (Wales)

 

Financing Study Abroad the Smart Way

Financing Study Abroad the Smart Way”

by Julia Dunn via “ULoop”

Do you flip for France? Are you sold on the idea of an Australian outback adventure? Want to float down the Italian canals reading ancient literature, but have no clue how you’ll afford it?

If you’re a wanderlust soul with a wallet restriction who’s interested in earning university credits while experiencing a foreign country, don’t push a study abroad opportunity out of your prospects because you think you won’t be able to swing it financially. There are resources and tricks available to you as a college student that you may not even know about, many of which will guide you through financing study abroad!

Universities know that college students can’t afford to pay for an entire study abroad trip on their own, on top of tuition and the student fees they pay just to attend college; thus, they offer certain types of financial aid to students looking to travel in their undergraduate careers. Beyond that, the elements of a study abroad trip can be modified in a cost-efficient way to suit your budget if financial aid alone doesn’t cover all of what you need money-wise.

According to a survey conducted by Knox College Associate Professor of Modern Languages Robin Ragan, cost is the number one reason students hesitate to pursue a trip abroad.

Robin concluded that “A lot of times [not being able to afford it] is an assumption that students make up front, but they don’t really have numbers at their side to prove they can’t afford it … Our challenge is getting to students who assume they can’t study abroad because of the cost before they even attend the info sessions.”

It doesn’t hurt to gather some information and learn about what’s out there; if you don’t, you could be missing out on an insanely awesome trip. Here’s how to make study abroad fit in your wallet.

1. Contact your university’s study abroad program for details on financial aid packages and how to apply for them.

The best way to obtain accurate information about study abroad and financial aid at your school is to directly contact the department, either through phone, email, or literally walking through their door to pick up a study abroad financing pamphlet. The staff at your university’s study abroad department has worked with tons of students to create an affordable study abroad plan that works for them—they want to help you go abroad just as badly as you want to go yourself!

See if your school offers study-abroad information sessions or events that you can attend for more information on financial aid loans and other “free money” opportunities. These may be useful to you when designing a financial plan-of-attack.

2. Be strategic when choosing a study abroad location.

The cost of living is different country to country. It’s going to wind up being more expensive to study abroad in Spain than it would be in Senegal, and study abroad financial advisers can help you compare the cost of living in certain countries with others. Investigate various housing options and their costs, along with that of transportation and other logistical elements that can add unexpected costs to your travel bill if you don’t address them before you leave for your trip.

Make sure you have lodging, food, and a means of getting around town factored into your budget, and put in the effort to research cost-efficient options for these matters.

Don’t know where to go? Click here to explore possible study abroad programs and locations organized in Uloop’s Study Abroad search.

3. Shorten your trip to 2-4 weeks.

When college students envision a study abroad trip, most think of spending months and months on end (even an entire semester or quarter) traversing hidden cities of Peru or exploring the Great Barrier Reef for an entire season. If money is an issue for you,consider only going abroad for a couple of weeks.

You’ll receive virtually the same immersive experience as someone going abroad for a longer time period, but you won’t have to pay for all that extra time. Plan out what you’ll do each day to maximize your time abroad, and you’ll be able to do most everything you want to do in just a few weeks! . . . .

READ MORE

2015-2016 FAFSA School Code List

I have officially modified the website according to the 2015-2016 FAFSA School Code List.  All the links have been modified, and the list of schools and universities has been updated.  

You should take note of the changes, and verify that any school you are interested in is still there.  Once again, the number of possibilities has continued to decrease. There were more than 10 schools removed from the list and only 3-4 added in. Argentina had a university added, as the only new country on the list.  

Gilman Scholarship

Don’t have money to study abroad? Check out the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship!

The Gilman Scholarship is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and is open to U.S. undergraduate students who demonstrate high financial need. “

ELEGIBILITY

Sharon Kuo

  • “The applicant must be receiving a Federal Pell Grant or provide proof that he/she will be receiving a Pell Grant at the time of application or during the term of his/her study abroad program or internship. 
  • The applicant is applying to or has been accepted into a study abroad program or internship eligible for credit by the student’s accredited institution of higher education in the U.S.
  • The applicant is studying or interning abroad for at least four weeks in one country. Programs going to more than one country are eligible if the student will be in one country for at least four consecutive weeks.
  • The applicant is studying or interning abroad in any country except Cuba or a country on the U.S. Department of State’s current Travel Warning list. ” 

 

A 360-Degree View on Studying Abroad

Wow! This article offers some really great advice! **DB

“A 360-Degree View on Studying Abroad”

by Besart Bajrami via “Huffington Post”

Moving beyond borders for a novel experience can be the solution to your post-teenage existentialist crisis; discovering yourselves in different environments is both challenging and bold. What better way to do that than, pick a spot on the map and starting looking for an exchange program at the Universities offering such an alternative. So long, crazy boring routines and nosy parents that only want the best for you; one hell of an adventure will be waiting for you on the other side where supposedly grass is always greener.

Why study abroad? 

A lot of people might wonder, why go through all those tiring procedures so you can end up in a strange environment full of unknown people you know nothing about? Is the degree more valuable or in fact the experience is one of a kind?Precisely. Continue reading

2014-2015 FAFSA School Code List

I have officially modified the website according to the 2014-2015 FAFSA School Code List.  All the links have been modified, and the list of schools and universities has been updated.  

You should take note of the changes, and verify that any school you are interested in is still there.  There were quite a few changes as many schools were dropped off the list and a few new ones were added.  I am sure that some people are going to be disappointed ~ there were far more removals than additions, including many that surprised me.  On the other hand, if you have always wanted to visit Saba, (a small island in the Caribbean which I am, for some reason only just hearing about), their medical school was added.