#Travel #Foodies Unites!

#Beef Stomach! 

What do you think? Ready for some spicy cow stomach?  Red Peppers are super #spicy!  And some Green onions thrown in for that special flavor ūüćī 

Ok – Sorry, I like #ChineseFood. I even like the spicy!  But Stomach is a bit much for me. ūüėú So Im gonna have to pass – more for you guys! ūüėān

What’s a strange Food you ate studying abroad?!?  Answerin the comments below!

#Travel #Foodies Unites!

#Beef Stomach! 

What do you think? Ready for some spicy cow stomach?  Red Peppers are super #spicy!  And some Green onions thrown in for that special flavor ūüćī 

Ok – Sorry, I like #ChineseFood. I even like the spicy!  But Stomach is a bit much for me. ūüėú So Im gonna have to pass – more for you guys! ūüėān

What’s a strange Food you ate studying abroad?!?  Answerin the comments below!

2015-2016 FAFSA School Code List

I have officially modified the website according to the 2015-2016 FAFSA School Code List.  All the links have been modified, and the list of schools and universities has been updated.  

You should take note of the changes, and verify that any school you are interested in is still there. More schools are gone this year than I’ve ever seen before, but there are some good ones added.

Gone:

  • Australian Catholic University (Australia)
  • Avondale College Limited (Australia)
  • Curtin University of Technology¬†(Australia)
  • Deakin University¬†(Australia)
  • Northern Territory University¬†(Australia)
  • Queensland University of Technology¬†(Australia)
  • Swinburne University of Technology¬†(Australia)
  • University of Newcastle¬†(Australia)
  • University of Southern Australia¬†(Australia)
  • University of Western Sydney¬†(Australia)
  • Victoria University of Technology¬†(Australia)
  • Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium)
  • Canadian Southern Baptist Seminary (Canada)
  • Capilano University (Canada)
  • Institute for Christian Studies (Canada)
  • McMaster University¬†(Canada)
  • Medicine Hat College¬†(Canada)
  • Nova Scotia College of Art & Design¬†(Canada)
  • Rocky Mountain College¬†(Canada)
  • Trent University¬†(Canada)
  • University of Lethbridge¬†(Canada)
  • University of Waterloo¬†(Canada)
  • 3rd Faculty of Medice, Charles University (Czech Republic)
  • University of Cambridge-New Hall (England)
  • University of Szeged Faculty of Medicine (Hungary)
  • Pontifical North American College (Italy)
  • Pontificia Universita Gregoriana (Italy)
  • Pontificia University San Tommaso (Italy)
  • Universidad de Guanajuato (Mexico)
  • Autonomous University of Tamaulipas (Mexico)
  • University of Waikato
  • University of Bergen (Norway)
  • University of Oslo (Norway)
  • Escuela Superior Administracion y Direccion de Empresas (Spain)
  • Karolinska Institutet (Sweden)
  • Nyenrode Business Universiteit (Netherlands)
  • University of Glamorgan (Wales)

 

New

  • Masarykova Univerzita (Czech Republic)
  • Norwich University of the Arts (England)
  • Regent’s University London (England)
  • University of Chester (England)
  • University of West London (England)
  • Cork Institute of Technology (Ireland)
  • Universidad del Noreste (Mexico)
  • Universidad de la Salle Bajio (Mexico)
  • Medical University of the Americas (St. Kitts-Nevis)
  • University of South Wales (Wales)

 

2015-2016 FAFSA School Code List

I have officially modified the website according to the 2015-2016 FAFSA School Code List.  All the links have been modified, and the list of schools and universities has been updated.  

You should take note of the changes, and verify that any school you are interested in is still there.  Once again, the number of possibilities has continued to decrease. There were more than 10 schools removed from the list and only 3-4 added in. Argentina had a university added, as the only new country on the list.  

White House enlists travel bloggers to get students to study abroad

White House enlists travel bloggers to get students to study abroad

by Jessica Plautz via “Mashable

White-house

The White House hosted 100 travel bloggers in a summit on Tuesday to sell them on the government’s plan to promote study abroad among U.S. students.

Bloggers who attended the event ‚ÄĒ called the White House Travel Blogger Summit on Study Abroad and Global Citizenship ‚ÄĒ were largely on board with this message, which they promoted via social media Thursday, using the hashtag #StudyAbroadBecause.

The National Security Council is leading the effort, and the U.S. State Department will soon open a U.S. Study Abroad Office to support initiatives that will get more college students to take their academic studies to other countries, and return home with valuable language skills and international awareness. There will be an online study-abroad fair on Feb. 25.

The U.S. government also aims to increase study abroad in countries outside of the European Union; 32% of study abroad in 2013 was to the UK, Italy and Spain.

It also wants to increase diversity among students who go abroad; about 62% of U.S. college students are white, but they make up 76% of students who travel abroad.

study-abroad-chart

Chart representing the

IMAGE: U.S. STATE DEPARTMENT, U.S. CENSUS BUREAU

Bloggers were warmly welcomed by the government at Tuesday’s summit ‚ÄĒ a departure from its typical attitude toward members of the media. When it comes to promoting study abroad, it seems that the government sees bloggers as allies.

Senior officials who spoke to attendees on Tuesday included White House chief of staff Denis McDonough, assistant to the president and Michelle Obama’s chief of staff Tina Tchen, commerce secretary Penny Pritzker, deputy national security adviser for strategic communication Ben Rhodes and more. It was a veritable procession of VIPs, thanking attendees for the work they do in promoting travel.

The government is looking to bloggers ‚ÄĒ who range from journalists adhering to traditional reporting standards to sponsored storytellers ‚ÄĒ to influence students, hoping that they can reach the ever-elusive millennial demographic.

However, it’s unclear whether travel bloggers can, in fact, influence this group ‚ÄĒ and whether study broad is even a worthwhile endeavor for American students. . . .”

READ MORE

UHV Students Learn about Chinese Business Customs on Study Abroad Trip

“UHV Students Learn about Chinese Business Customs on Study Abroad Trip”

via “Victoria Advocate

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A group of 29 University of Houston-Victoria School of Business Administration students recently exchanged ideas with Chinese students and business executives during a two-week study abroad program in China.

During the trip, 22 UHV graduate students, seven UHV undergraduate students and six doctoral and master’s students from the Central University of Finance and Economics in China studied Chinese leadership management and toured commerce and cultural sites.

Jifu Wang, a UHV associate professor of management who organized the study abroad program, said the most memorable part of the trip was the interaction between UHV students and the people they met in China.

“It was amazing to see the exchanges our students had with the different people they met in the classroom and at various sites around China,” Wang said. “They got a firsthand look at some of the differences in economy, management and culture. Our students learned a great deal during their visit.”

This is the second time UHV has offered a study abroad program in China. The program increased in popularity after five students made the trip in 2013. UHV was able to cover more travel expenses this time because of a $600,000 donation to the UHV School of Business Administration by Chinese businessman Bingxin Wu and his wife, Shuqin Feng. Their gift a year ago was the largest the school has ever received. In addition to providing scholarships for students to attend the study abroad program in China, this donation was used for the establishment of the Wu-Feng Center for International Business.

“Thanks to Chairman Wu’s generosity, many more students were able to make this memorable trip,” said Farhang Niroomand, dean of the UHV School of Business Administration. “Business today is more global than ever, and getting a chance to learn firsthand the leadership practice of another culture is a valuable experience.”

Niroomand was one of several lecturers to share insights with Chinese and UHV students who earned credit for the course. . . .

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Appreciating Home By Traveling

Appreciating Home By Traveling

by Rich Feffer via “BootsnAll

For people who love to travel, the thought of home is often secondary, if not downright loathsome or terrifying.  While we wile away at our 9-5′s or type up that next term paper, our minds so often wander abroad.

It’s to be expected of course.  Travel perpetually offers excitement, new experiences, and the freshness of being in an unfamiliar place: that oh-so-pleasant over-stimulation.  It’s the wonderful distraction from our normally mundane daily living.

Travel offers more than escape from our lives, however.  In fact, travel can make us appreciate our homes in ways we might never have thought.  While we’re at home daydreaming of adventures overseas, thinking of all the things we can’t wait to get away from, we’re often forgetting to look right under our noses at the conveniences and beauties of our own home.  Funny enough, never can this become more clear than when we’re away, looking at home from the other side.

Here are eight things you might discover about home the next time you take off on that big trip:

1. That special ‚Äúlocal‚Äôs knowledge‚ÄĚ you never knew you had

Local Knowledge

 

What we take for granted at home may astound us when we travel.  Upon landing we’re suddenly thrust into completely unfamiliar surroundings.  The formerly simple now confounds, the known now unknown.  How do I pay for a ticket on the bus?  Is this neighborhood safe at night?  Where’s the local spot for cheap beer?

When we’re traveling, we remember how much we know about our home and how sweet it is to be a local.

At home, we navigate the bus system without a thought, and we know which nights of the week churn out the live music.  Knowledge of the best burger in town is an innate part of our being.

Why is it always best to ask the locals for advice?  Because where we live runs in our veins.  When we’re traveling, we remember how much we know about our home and how sweet it is to be a local.

2. Your own backyard

Rocky Mountains

 

There are French art museums and Egyptian pyramids.  You go to Peru to go hiking, hit those Thai beaches to soak up the sun, and go on safari in Africa.  The world offers us so much it’s impossible to ignore. How come we often ignore all those treasures that our own cities and countries bestow us?

When you’re traveling, it may dawn on you how much you’ve missed right where you live.

If you‚Äôve never ‚Äútraveled‚ÄĚ your own country before, traveling in others may open your eyes to the possibilities. ¬†There you are, an American hiking in Nepal, yet you‚Äôve never seen the Rockies? ¬†You may find yourself alone, Irish, marveling at colonial architecture in Mexico when you suddenly realize that you pass by older, equally beautiful buildings on the way to work every day.

When you’re traveling, it may dawn on you how much you’ve missed right where you live, and you may find yourself making plans to discover the attractions listed in our own town’s tourist brochure.

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Kids Studying Abroad Are Now Never Out of Touch

Kids Studying Abroad Are Now Never Out of Touch

by Beth J. Harpaz via “ABC News”

A generation ago, students on semester abroad were practically incommunicado, aside from airmailed letters and one or two calls home. These days, from the minute the plane lands, kids studying overseas are connected with home via Skype, Facebook, and messaging apps like Viber and WhatsApp.

Has technology altered semester abroad by making it impossible to immerse yourself in another culture? Or does staying in touch simply increase comfort levels, easing both homesickness and parental worries?

Jane Tabachnick of Montclair, New Jersey, remembers airmailing letters to her parents when she studied in Paris for nine months at age 21, long before the cellphone era. “I knew they were worried and that they’d be waiting by the mailbox,” she said. “It seemed like an eternity between letters.”

It was different when Tabachnick’s 21-year-old daughter lived in Russia and Paris as part of her studies at Rutgers University. They often conversed by Skype or GoogleChat. “My daughter is very mature and level-headed and I’m not a big worrier, but I’m a parent, and she’s across the world, and it was just so easy to be in touch,” Tabachnick said.

On the other hand, she said, the less she heard from her daughter the better, and not because she didn’t miss her: “When I hear from her a little less, I know she’s out having fun.”

Robbin Watson was forced to give up screen time with the home crowd when her laptop was damaged during a semester in Italy six years ago, when she was 19.

“I was devastated at first, wondering to myself, ‘How will I know what’s going on at home? How will I Skype my friends?'” she recalled.

But as time went on, her experience in Rome “drastically changed. I began to go out more, no longer running home from class to hop online. I no longer thought about what was going on at college and soon, I began to not even care.”

Looking back, she’s grateful that her laptop was damaged. Her advice for semester abroad: “Get rid of your smartphone. The whole point of studying abroad is to immerse yourself in the culture, the people, the language. Once you have Skype, Facebook and constant calls from parents, I think it really takes away from the experience and becomes a huge distraction.”

Staying in touch is important to Daniele Weiss, 19, a New York University student who spent spring semester in Florence and is now in Israel for the summer. “My mom needs to hear from me every night before I go to sleep,” she said.

From Italy, six hours ahead of her parents, she’d call in the morning before her dad went to work, and then text throughout the day. She said most of her fellow American students also “stayed in contact with everybody from home. It was very comfortable and so easy. It’s not like I felt like I was missing out on the immersion. But I wanted to share things with my mom.” . . . .

READ MORE

2014-2015 FAFSA School Code List

I have officially modified the website according to the 2014-2015 FAFSA School Code List.  All the links have been modified, and the list of schools and universities has been updated.  

You should take note of the changes, and verify that any school you are interested in is still there.  There were quite a few changes as many schools were dropped off the list and a few new ones were added.  I am sure that some people are going to be disappointed ~ there were far more removals than additions, including many that surprised me.  On the other hand, if you have always wanted to visit Saba, (a small island in the Caribbean which I am, for some reason only just hearing about), their medical school was added.  

Studying Abroad: A R√©sum√© Builder

One of our Professors in Japan

One of our Professors in Japan

If you are interested in Studying Abroad or if you have Studied Abroad in the past, now might be a good time to look at how it can help expand your Résumé.   

Study Abroad

One of the simplest ways that you can use your Study Abroad experience in your¬†R√©sum√© is simply by listing it as part of your education. ¬†There are multiple ways you can benefit from this. ¬†First, if you are new to the career field, then your¬†R√©sum√© might be running a little thin on information; use the “Studying Abroad” experience as a filler/lengthener. ¬†Sounds silly/cheap, but everything counts in the job search. ¬†More importantly, if you list the foreign college that you studied under, it adds to the¬†depth of your educational experience. It shows that you have studied under Professors coming from different backgrounds or ways of thought. ¬†It adds to the fact that you might bring in unique or different ideas to their work. For example, I¬†have studied the Law in Civil Law nations and Common Law nations. That means that simply by stating that I studied in China and the United States, my interviewers can tell that I understand ways¬†different people view the law and how it can be applied in alternative ways. ¬† It strengthens the fact that I stand out from the rest of their applicants.

Skills

One of the things you are going to need on both your Résumé and your Cover Letter are key terms, skills, and/or character traits.  You will frequently be asked to name your strengths, weaknesses, and abilities.  Or perhaps you just need to show them what you can offer their team.  If you Study Abroad, there are many helpful terms that can now be applied to you.  Some of those you might use include: Continue reading