Study abroad trip to Normandy, Europe changes Georgia Highlands College students in unexpected ways

What an awesome experience!  It’s amazing what opportunities you get to be part of when you travel abroad! I’m sure they will remember this forever. **DB

“Study abroad trip to Normandy, Europe changes Georgia Highlands College students in unexpected ways”

by Kristina Wilder via “Rome News Tribune

Study abroad

“It was truly the trip of a lifetime.

At the beginning of June, seven Georgia Highlands College students and two faculty members went to London to begin a trip organized by EF College Tours. The tour followed the route of World War II soldiers and was part of a Western Civilization class at the college. The study abroad trip was open to students not taking the class as well as those who were.

After two days in London, they left by bus on June 5 to Portsmouth where they took a ferry across the English Channel and landed in Caen in Normandy, France.

It was along that coast on June 6, 1944, where the Allies’ D-Day invasion began during World War II.

Already excited about the planned tour, the group got an especially thrilling treat when the tour guides secured invitations for the group to attend the ceremonies at the American cemetery on Omaha Beach. President Barack Obama and French President Francois Hollande were scheduled to speak and security was exceptionally tight.

“The highway was shut down and our bus had a police escort to get to Omaha Beach,” said Bronson Long, professor at Georgia Highlands. “We saw Marine One land and the Secret Service was there, the military was there. It was huge. It was standing room only.”

The group attended the ceremonies in Normandy on the 70th anniversary of D-Day. Surrounded by veterans of the war and 51 heads of state, the group was a little overwhelmed.

“I think we all cried, it was so emotional,” said Megan Broome, one of the students. “It was just incredible that we got to be there and experience that.”

Broome, who was enjoying her first trip overseas was especially grateful for the experience.

“I’ve never even been out of the southeastern states, so it was really special for me,” she said. “I think it was really amazing that while listening to President Hollande, he spoke in French of course, and I don’t understand French, but it was still so affecting  . . . .”

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“A French Guy’s Practical Tips for a Quick Trip to Paris”

“A French Guy’s Practical Tips for a Quick Trip to Paris”

by Olivier Knox via “Yahoo!

A French Guy’s Practical Tips for a Quick Trip to Paris

For years, friends, colleagues, and acquaintances have come to Olivier Knox — a Frenchman turned Chief Washington Correspondent for Yahoo News — for advice about Paris. Yahoo Travel may have already briefed you on how to not look like an idiot in Paris, but some lessons are worth learning twice.

Here’s his tricks that even the best-prepared Americans should brush up on:

GENERAL RULES

Restaurant reservations: make them when you can.

Don’t go to Paris in August. Everyone is on vacation, restaurants are closed, the city is steaming, and you will be, too, when you realize all you’re missing out on.

Paris is a big city. Big-city rules apply. Making eye contact with strangers, smiling at them, saying “Hello” is not encouraged in Paris any more than it is encouraged in New York City. If you’re a woman and you smile at a man, he will assume that you are… courting. And that’s the charitable interpretation. BUT, there’s one big caveat…

Say hello to store clerks. When you walk into thatboulangerie to buy the éclairs that you and your kids will devour on one of the green benches in the Jardin du Luxembourg, don’t order immediately. First, greet the person behind the register. “Bonjour Monsieur” or “Bonjour Madame” or even a “Good morning sir/ma’am” establishes that you are a polite American familiar with the local culture and not like that one hyena who refused to put out his cigar in a church until someone asked him in English (Yup. True story).  If there’s a crowd, they may prompt you with an “et pour Monsieur/Madame.” But the French think it’s rude to define personal interaction solely on the basis of a financial “transaction. . . .”

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“A Beginner’s Guide to Franglais”

For students studying in France (the most visited place in the world)

“A Beginner’s Guide to Franglais”

by Jessica Phalen via “Global Post

“PARIS, France — Do you want the good news or the bad news first?

The good news, at least for people who don’t speak French: You’ll hear lots of English in France. The bad news: You won’t understand it.

It looks like English. It sounds like English. Some of it really is English. But it doesn’t mean what you’d expect it to mean.

If Anglophones love to pilfer from other languages (pilfer: from the Old Frenchpelfrer), the French like to add their ownje ne sais quoi. No, really: without some help, you wouldn’t savoir quoi they’re on about.

In the spirit of mutual mistranslation, here’s a brief glossary of the weirdest “English” words you need a French dictionary to understand — not to mention a few bons mots we’ve adopted in English that just won’t fly in France.

 Un after-work (n). An event that takes place after work. Simple, effective, yet irremediably ugly.

Le baby-foot (n). Table football. I just… I don’t even know. . . . . .”

“Bon Voyage! Arrival: Essential Travel Advice For Your Year Abroad In France”

“Bon Voyage! Arrival: Essential Travel Advice For Your Year Abroad In France”

by Megan Ainsworth via “LS Media”

 

“As I stepped off the Rhone Express tram at Lyon’s huge Part-Dieu train station, I immediately felt a million miles away from home. Surrounded by loud French accents, speeding taxi drivers on the ‘wrong’ side of the road and the scorching sun beaming down on my head, I was overwhelmed. I tentatively crossed the road, struggling with my two drastically overweight suitcases, and made my way towards. . . . “

 

“Study Abroad Part Two: France”

“Study Abroad Part Two: France”

by Casey Harper via “The Hillsdale Collegian”

Photo by KEI841 via Deviant Art–Photo not attached to original article. Click image to be taken to the artist’s website.

“Looming above the students is the Eiffel Tower. The structure is iconic but also serves as a reminder that they are finally in the country and culture they love so much. Hillsdale students spent the summer taking classes in France to polish their language skills and experience the French culture. “Studying in Paris enabled me to connect my affinity for French literature and history to actual French people,” Junior Jenna Adamson said. . . “