Studying Abroad: A Résumé Builder

One of our Professors in Japan

One of our Professors in Japan

If you are interested in Studying Abroad or if you have Studied Abroad in the past, now might be a good time to look at how it can help expand your Résumé.   

Study Abroad

One of the simplest ways that you can use your Study Abroad experience in your Résumé is simply by listing it as part of your education.  There are multiple ways you can benefit from this.  First, if you are new to the career field, then your Résumé might be running a little thin on information; use the “Studying Abroad” experience as a filler/lengthener.  Sounds silly/cheap, but everything counts in the job search.  More importantly, if you list the foreign college that you studied under, it adds to the depth of your educational experience. It shows that you have studied under Professors coming from different backgrounds or ways of thought.  It adds to the fact that you might bring in unique or different ideas to their work. For example, I have studied the Law in Civil Law nations and Common Law nations. That means that simply by stating that I studied in China and the United States, my interviewers can tell that I understand ways different people view the law and how it can be applied in alternative ways.   It strengthens the fact that I stand out from the rest of their applicants.

Skills

One of the things you are going to need on both your Résumé and your Cover Letter are key terms, skills, and/or character traits.  You will frequently be asked to name your strengths, weaknesses, and abilities.  Or perhaps you just need to show them what you can offer their team.  If you Study Abroad, there are many helpful terms that can now be applied to you.  Some of those you might use include: Continue reading

“Tips for Preparing Teens for Overseas Travel This Summer”

“Tips for Preparing Teens for Overseas Travel This Summer”

via “Salem News

Teen traveling abroad

Encourage culturally sensitive and appropriate dress. For example, short shorts and tank tops don’t travel well in most developing countries.

A company that for over 30 years has delivered meaningful international travel experiences for teens offers tips for families sending their children internationally this summer.

“Health precautions, securing documents, packing and communications are at the top of every traveler’s list. There are so many things parents can do in advance of a trip to help things go smoothly,” says Scott von Eschen, President of Adventures Cross-Country (ARCC – http://www.adventurescrosscountry.com/).

Since 1983 Adventures Cross-Country has provided domestic and international cultural experiences through travel that combine service projects, adventure and sometimes language immersion for students ages 13 to 19.

The seasoned professionals at ARCC have combined the best tips and precautions they’ve given parents and teens over the past 30 years and offer this sage advice for the international traveler:

Documents:

Health Precautions:

“US University Delegation Arrives in Israel to Forge New Study Abroad Partnerships”

“US University Delegation Arrives in Israel to Forge New Study Abroad Partnerships”

By LIDAR GRAVÉ-LAZI

“A delegation of 13 representatives from leading universities and study abroad programs in the United States arrived in Israel for a weeklong visit, geared toward developing new study abroad collaborations with Israeli institutions.
Masa Israel Journey, a partnership between the Jewish Agency and the government, organized the visit along with the Foreign Ministry.
While in Israel, the delegation, comprised of. . . .”

 

“Open Doors 2013: International Students in the United States and Study Abroad by American Students are at All-Time High”

Hey guys, accord to this, “fewer than 10 percent of all U.S. college students study abroad at some point during their undergraduate years.”–That’s atrocious! There are actually fewer options available to graduate students, so check out the opportunities now!

“Open Doors 2013: International Students in the United States and Study Abroad by American Students are at All-Time High”

Press Release via “Open Doors

“November 11, 2013—The 2013 Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange, released today, finds the number of international students at colleges and universities in the United States increased by seven percent to a record high of 819,644 students in the 2012/13 academic year, while U.S. students studying abroad increased by three percent to an all-time high of more than 283,000.

In 2012/13, 55,000 more international students enrolled in U.S. higher education compared to 2011/12, with most of the growth driven by China and Saudi Arabia. This marks the seventh consecutive year that Open Doors reported expansion in the total number of international students in U.S. higher education. There are now 40 percent more international students studying at U.S. colleges and universities than a decade ago, and the rate of increase has risen steadily for the past three years. International students make up slightly under four percent of total student enrollment at the graduate and undergraduate level combined. International students’ spending in all 50 states contributed approximately $24 billion to the U.S. economy.

The number of U.S. students who studied abroad for academic credit increased by three percent to 283,332 students in 2011/12, a higher rate of growth than the one percent increase the previous year. More U.S. students went to Latin America and China, and there was a rebound in those going to Japan as programs reopened in Fall 2011 after the earthquake and tsunami of March 2011. Study abroad by American students has more than tripled over the past two decades, from approximately 71,000 students in 1991/92 to the record number in 2011/12. Despite these increases, fewer than 10 percent of all U.S. college students study abroad at some point during their undergraduate years. . . . .”

Summer Countdown: Passport Applications

Just wanted to remind everyone that if you are actually interested in studying abroad over the summer or fall, you need to start on the Passport process now.  You can’t always wait until you’re accepted into a program in March or April; you need to get on top of the Passport thing early. Even if you already have the Passport, you might need new pages for it if you travel frequently and almost all countries require that the Passport not expire until at least 6 months after the estimated end of your trip.

Every year it takes longer and longer to get a Passport, especially if you aren’t the simplest case.  Dual citizenship, foreign citizenship, criminal records, and a history of visiting or coming from difficult locations (Middle East, China, Etc.) can all add to the wait time for a new or renewed Passport.

Plus, you have to have a Passport to get a Visa, arrange flights, set up hotel reservations, and other steps.

So go ahead and get the ball rolling to make sure you have it early! 

For helpful instructions check out theGetting a Passport’ section on our site “Students Ramblings. We also have information for ‘Renewing your Passport. Or just head straight over to the State Department’s website.

Bringing Global Home

“Bringing Global Home”

by Wendy B. Libby via “Huffington Post

“Study abroad. Perhaps no other experience has the ability to so swiftly and absolutely change students’ lives and prepare them for any opportunity the world might offer.

It’s widely acknowledged that immersing yourself in another culture and language stretches your view of the world. It provides experience in managing and navigating unique situations. It develops your confidence and helps you achieve personal growth while imparting concrete skills that last a lifetime. Not only are these core characteristics that we seek to instill in our students at Stetson University, but they are also critical – with a nod toThomas Friedman – to navigating our shrunken, flattened world. . . .”

Studying Abroad can be Difficult for CSE Students

Studying Abroad can be Difficult for CSE Students

by Katelyn Faulks via “Minnesota Daily

 

 

“For Ahmed Zaher, studying abroad would delay his graduation a full year. The mechanical engineering junior said he needs to stay on track.  “For my schedule, it’s difficult, because I have to graduate in four years,” he said. “If I take less than 12 credits, I can’t finish.” For University of Minnesota students in the sciences, studying abroad can be an extra challenge to fit . . . . “