Study Abroad: Making the Move

“Study Abroad: Making the Move”

by James Connington via “Telegraph

University year abroad: be prepared to head outside your comfort zone

When I signed up to go and live in a country where I don’t speak the main language, I figured that some embarrassment might be involved – at least in the first few weeks anyway.

What I didn’t bargain on was how quickly or frequently this would occur, which was a little overwhelming for my sleep deprived self after a 3:30am start.

My first venture into Bonn left a trail of bemused and angry waitresses, checkout assistants, taxi drivers and mobile network employees in my wake.

It also quickly became clear that things I thought I had sorted were, in fact, not; such as there being somebody to get keys from at my accommodation.

Thankfully, an extremely helpful Jordanian student was able to translate my absentee building manager’s voicemail, which told me that he was away. A quick TripAdvisor search secured me a hotel for the night and, aside from the financial setback, I was none the worse for wear.

There is, however, a point to these ramblings, beyond giving you something to laugh at. I’ve travelled a fair amount, and as a result of this I thought I was beyond prepared, I thought that I would breeze through any culture shock and instantly acclimatise.

As I discovered, this can be a risky attitude to take.

Some lessons can be learned from my mistakes. First of all don’t get complacent; if there’s any ambiguity in the arrangements for your arrival, then get them clarified (this may involve you annoying some people). . . . .

READ MORE

“17 Tips for Studying Abroad!”

“17 Tips for Studying Abroad!”

by Stacey Lindsay via “Seventeen

Be a Copycat

Dando, Wegscheider and Stephenson all recommend making copies of your passport — print out several to bring with you, and email a scanned copy to yourself. “That way, if you lose it, you can always go to an Internet café and print it out,” says Stephenson. This applies for other essential documentation as well: “I’ll scan my travel information and all itineraries and send to Google documents or a shared site,” says Wegscheider.

Purse Patrol

For carrying essentials, a smaller cross body bag is ideal, according to Wegscheider and Stephenson. Be sure to keep it close to your body, or on your lap if you are at a club or restaurant — never put in on the back of your chair or on the floor! “I have known so many people who have had their wallets stolen out of their bags when it was at their feet,” says Stephenson. 

Learn About Foreign Traffic Safety

Road accidents for passengers and pedestrians are a serious matter, both here and abroad. Perhaps even more so in a country where traffic comes from the other direction! Check out the Association for Safe International Road Travel (ASIRT) and Sara’s Wish Foundation for helpful info. . . . .

READ MORE

“Tech Tips For Travel To Latin America”

“Tech Tips For Travel To Latin America”

by Ariel Coro via “Huffington Post

“After a long journey visiting relatives back home in South America or the Caribbean this holiday season, it would be well advised to arrive to your hotel well prepared. I recommend traveling armed with the right gadgets and tech that save space, are light and have multiple functions. Below are a few suggestions for your next trip abroad.

For travelers who enjoy photography, instead of lugging around a big camera, you can now carry, just the lens. What do I mean? Sony just released the Cybershot QX10, a wireless zoom lens for your smartphone. It connects to the lens through 
Wi-Fi and you can operate it using the Sony Play Memories app to take photos, videos and control the zoom lens. . . . .”

 

 

“Going It Alone: 7 Tips for Successful Solo Travel”

“Going It Alone: 7 Tips for Successful Solo Travel”

by Nikki Bayley via “CNN

“To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world.”

So wrote the great travel writer Freya Stark in her 1932 book “Baghdad Sketches.”

It’s been my motto traveling solo through 30 countries in 21 years.

I took my first trip alone, to Greece, at 22.

I remember walking to the beach, Nirvana’s “Nevermind” blaring in my headphones, and realizing: no one knows where the hell I am.

I’ve been chasing that euphoric feeling ever since. . . . .”

 

 

“How to Dial “911″ Around the World”

“How to Dial “911″ Around the World”

by Carlos Alcos via “Matador Network

 

Perhaps it’s the “it’ll never happen to me” syndrome why many of us travelers aren’t as prepared as we should be. If you’re in Thailand, Spain, or Bolivia, would you know what number to dial to get some emergency service?

Some history

In 1937, London became the first city to introduce a system where callers could dial a short 3-digit number to get immediate help. They chose 999 as it was difficult to accidentally dial on the old pulse-dial phones. Calling 999 alerted a switch-board operator by sounding a buzzer and flashing a red light.

The first 911 system in North America was set up in Winnipeg, Canada in 1959 and, nine years later, Alabama and Alaska followed suit to bring it to the US. It wasn’t until the 1980s that 911 became a standard under the North American Numbering Plan.

There were many obstacles to overcome such as being routed to the wrong jurisdiction, but with switching technological advances, almost every single location in North America has an accurate 911 service today. . . . .

 

“50 Travel Tips You Must Know Before You Go: Phil Tripp’s Top Tips”

“50 Travel Tips You Must Know Before You Go: Phil Tripp’s Top Tips”

by Phil Tripp via “The Australian

World traveller Phil Tripp has shared his advice.

Why the women’s wear?

It’s not a case of cross dressing. It’s just common sense for any man travelling with a female travel companion, in case of lost luggage.

And no, it doesn’t mean the female counterpart gets to fill her own luggage AND half her fella’s suitcase too.

She should carry a few changes of clothes for her partner in her luggage, too.

That way, if one piece of luggage is lost or delayed, both travellers will always have something to wear. . . . “

 

Real Travelers’ Best Tips

“Real Travelers’ Best Tips”

via “CNN

“While Travel + Leisure has its own little black book of hotel tips and air travel tricks, we wanted to take a page out of yours, too.

So T+L teamed up with CNN to solicit advice from seasoned CNN iReporters as part of our Ways to Travel Better campaign—and posed some questions to get them going. What’s your secret to navigating a crowded airport? How about a tip for nabbing a table at the hottest restaurant in town? Do you have a favorite money-saving app or website? . . . .”