From CEA Study Abroad

10 Reasons to Study Abroad

“From CEA Study Abroad”

Advertisements

“Move Over Summers In France, This Woman Is Changing The Face Of Study Abroad”

“Move Over Summers In France, This Woman Is Changing The Face Of Study Abroad”

by Denise Restauri via “Forbes

Eliza Pesuit likes to rock the boat. And she’s taking high school juniors with her. Eliza is the 30-year-old CEO ofGlobal Glimpse, a non-profit organization that brings students together from diverse communities — from affluent Marin County to the South Bronx — to become change agents in their local communities and beyond. Global Glimpse takes students out of their comfort zone, pushes them to challenge assumptions and shows them that they are capable of more than they ever thought possible.

In marginalized communities, too many students with leadership potential get lost before the end of high school. Global Glimpse partners with public high schools in these low and mixed income neighborhoods to deliver a program that engages students, teachers, administrators and families.

But Global Glimpse isn’t just for students from marginalized communities — it’s for everyone. Through after school workshops and a three week structured group immersion experience in Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic or Ecuador, high school juniors develop confidence and life-changing skills.

And this non-profit has a sustainable and scalable business model. Global Glimpse currently partners with 50 high schools in the San Francisco Bay Area and New York City, and will launch their first programs in Chicago in the fall of 2015. It is the only organization in the student travel field committed to serving low-income youth on a large scale. Since it started in 2008, the organization has grown seven fold, served over 2000 students, and provided over $3 million in travel scholarships for low-income youth. In 2015 Global Glimpse expects to serve 750 students. 96% of Global Glimpse alumni go on to college in communities where the average college attendance rate is under 10%.

Eliza Pesuit, CEO of Global Glimpse. Photo credit Charles R Donaldson

Following is the Global Glimpse story, in Eliza’s words.

Shaking Things Up

Today’s youth learn about the world through media: TV, YouTube, facebook, twitter, etc. They grow up with the illusion of connection to a big world, but without personal experience. Global Glimpse gives students a doorway into another world while constantly tying this experience back to their lives in the United States. When you remove high school students from everything that is familiar and settle them in a developing country for three weeks, their common assumptions are shattered. Their perspectives on poverty and privilege, on the importance of education, and most importantly, on their ability and responsibility to effect change in the world change radically. They gain the ability to see and evaluate the world and their home communities with new eyes.

For example, we may have the illusion of racial equality in the United States, but American high schools are highly segregated. Global Glimpse deliberately shakes this up. Our groups are socioeconomically, racially and ethnically diverse. We’ll put a group of students from Greenwich together with a group from the South Bronx. It’s very rare for people from such diverse backgrounds to live together for an extended period time. We immerse them in a new reality and, through daily experiences and nightly reflection sessions, support them to understand each other, to recognize and respect their differences in backgrounds and views as well as find common ground.

We believe that closing the achievement gap requires not only providing low-income youth with opportunities that will set them on a path towards success, but also providing them with experiences that allow them to operate comfortably across socioeconomic lines. It is just as important for students from more affluent backgrounds to understand the realities low income communities face in this country as interntionally. . . . .

READ MORE

Duty While Students Are Abroad

“Duty While Students Are Abroad”

by Kaitlin Mulhere via “Higher Ed

A group of influential education organizations has stepped in to support a private prep school in its appeal against a former student, saying the case could have far-reaching negative effects on study abroad trips.

Cara Munn suffered brain damage after she contracted viral encephalitis in 2007 from a tick bite she received while on a school trip to China with the Hotchkiss School.

Last year, a Connecticut jury awarded Munn $41 million in damages, after agreeing with her family’s claims that the school had failed to take appropriate precautions and to get proper medical attention quickly enough.

The Hotchkiss School, a private boarding school in Lakeville, Conn., argued that the tick bite and the illness were so unlikely to occur that there was no way to prepare for or prevent them. Continue reading

“Local High School Student To Study Abroad in Korea”

Congrats Madison 🙂 I loved Korea!

“Local High School Student To Study Abroad in Korea”

by Cody Gibson via “Valdosta Today

school-notebook

VALDOSTA, GA – Madison Bridges, a high school student in Valdosta, GA, has been awarded a National Security Language Initiative for Youth (NSLI-Y) scholarship for 2014-2015. Madison will study Korean in South Korea for the Summer.

The NSLI-Y program is funded by the U.S. Department of State and provides merit-based scholarships for eligible high school students to learn less commonly-taught languages in summer and academic-year overseas immersion programs. The State Department offers approximately 625 students per year the change to study Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Korean, Persian, Russian, or Turkish overseas through NSLI-Y.

Launched in 2006, NSLI-Y seeks to increase the number of Americans who can engage with native speakers of critical languages by providing formal instruction and informal language practice in an immersion environment. The goals of the NSLI-Y program include sparking a life-long interest in foreign languages and cultures, and developing a corps of young Americans with the skills necessary to advance international dialogue and cross-cultural opportunities in the
private, academic, and government sectors. . . . .

READ MORE

Book Review: “The Guidebook for International Students in Québec”

I don’t know if I can really call this a book review, when it’s only a five page pdf, but what the hey! 🙂  Author Tobias Fisch has graciously put together a handy little online booklet for students interested in studying in Québec/Canada.  

To start with, a disclaimer: I get the feeling that the author is talking about studying in High School, because he/she discusses the opportunity to participate in Prom, Graduation, and the “big exams.”  Still, I didn’t think that really detracted from the guidebook–only a short part (the section on how classes work) was relevant to what level of education you’re in.  And if you are in  high school, it’s all good–especially the part about the 10-day schedule!

The rest of it went over generally helpful information for all students studying abroad (how to adjust to a host family, how to avoid homesickness) and then very specific information about Québec itself starting on page 3.  

Some of the things you might want to check out are the slang words used in Québecan French, how the money works, the standard tax rate (calculate it into your prices!), how to arrange phone communication, and the Unit changes.  Actually pretty much all of the information from pages 3-5 are helpful.  So if you are interested in studying in Canada, you might check it out!

“The Guidebook for International Students in Québec”

by Tobias fisch

Available on Smashwords/ Price: Free

“Tips for Preparing Teens for Overseas Travel This Summer”

“Tips for Preparing Teens for Overseas Travel This Summer”

via “Salem News

Teen traveling abroad

Encourage culturally sensitive and appropriate dress. For example, short shorts and tank tops don’t travel well in most developing countries.

A company that for over 30 years has delivered meaningful international travel experiences for teens offers tips for families sending their children internationally this summer.

“Health precautions, securing documents, packing and communications are at the top of every traveler’s list. There are so many things parents can do in advance of a trip to help things go smoothly,” says Scott von Eschen, President of Adventures Cross-Country (ARCC – http://www.adventurescrosscountry.com/).

Since 1983 Adventures Cross-Country has provided domestic and international cultural experiences through travel that combine service projects, adventure and sometimes language immersion for students ages 13 to 19.

The seasoned professionals at ARCC have combined the best tips and precautions they’ve given parents and teens over the past 30 years and offer this sage advice for the international traveler:

Documents:

Health Precautions:

Sarah Edgar Earns one of 65 Scholarships to Study Abroad

“Sarah Edgar Earns one of 65 Scholarships to Study Abroad”

by News Democrat Leader

“The U.S. Department of State has awarded Sarah Edgar, a high school student at Logan County High School one of 65 scholarships to study abroad on the Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) Abroad Program. The competitive, merit-based award covers the full cost of an academic year abroad, providing Sarah a full immersion experience through living with a host family in Bosnia and Herzegovina, attending a Bosnian high school, and helping her develop the skills necessary to be a leader in the global community. The YES abroad program is funded by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

 

Through Sarah’s participation in the YES Abroad program, she will be at the forefront of citizen diplomacy, serving as a “youth ambassador” in her host country, promoting . . . . “