Middlebury Schools Abroad: School in the Middle East

Middlebury Schools Abroad:

School in the Middle East

Host(s)

  • CV Starr-Middlebury School in the Middle East
  • Brandeis University
  • Ben Gurion University
  • Middlebury Schools

Countries:

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UK Is the Most Searched for Study Abroad Destination for Americans

“UK Is the Most Searched for Study Abroad Destination for Americans”

by Akane Otani via “SKIFT

Foshie  / Flickr

Spending a semester in a foreign country is usually billed as a way for college kids to acquire experience with different cultures and environments, but U.S. students studying abroad seem drawn to places where most people speak their language.

London, Oxford, and Cambridge are the most searched-for cities by U.S. students who hope to study overseas, according to a report published Wednesday by Google.

Google analyzed its data to find the volume of U.S. queries for a list of global cities that included search terms “relating to higher education.” After London, Oxford, and Cambridge, U.S. students searched the most for Edinburgh, Melbourne, Seoul, Sydney, and Dublin. Nine of the top 20 cities were in the U.K. Just three of the top 20—Hong Kong, Singapore, and Shanghai—were Asian cities.

Google

London, Oxford, and Cambridge are the three most searched- for cities in the world among U.S. students looking to study abroad. Melbourne, Australia; Seoul, Korea; and Sydney, Australia also ranked highly.

Even when Google rearranged its rankings to exclude searches for specific university names, London was the most searched-for city, followed by Paris, Barcelona, Berlin, and Singapore. “No matter how we looked at it, by university brand or just generic keywords, there is no doubt that London and the United Kingdom are the biggest magnets for U.S. students looking to study abroad,” said Harry Walker, education industry head at Google.

Why London? Beloved accents and academic powerhouses aside, London is a hub of business and finance—the most searched-for subject among U.S. students looking to study in the city, Google says. Students might also be drawn to the city’s eminence in fashion, medicine, and art, Google’s data suggests. Bonus: It doesn’t hurt that there’s no language barrier to grapple with.

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Studying Abroad: A Résumé Builder

One of our Professors in Japan

One of our Professors in Japan

If you are interested in Studying Abroad or if you have Studied Abroad in the past, now might be a good time to look at how it can help expand your Résumé.   

Study Abroad

One of the simplest ways that you can use your Study Abroad experience in your Résumé is simply by listing it as part of your education.  There are multiple ways you can benefit from this.  First, if you are new to the career field, then your Résumé might be running a little thin on information; use the “Studying Abroad” experience as a filler/lengthener.  Sounds silly/cheap, but everything counts in the job search.  More importantly, if you list the foreign college that you studied under, it adds to the depth of your educational experience. It shows that you have studied under Professors coming from different backgrounds or ways of thought.  It adds to the fact that you might bring in unique or different ideas to their work. For example, I have studied the Law in Civil Law nations and Common Law nations. That means that simply by stating that I studied in China and the United States, my interviewers can tell that I understand ways different people view the law and how it can be applied in alternative ways.   It strengthens the fact that I stand out from the rest of their applicants.

Skills

One of the things you are going to need on both your Résumé and your Cover Letter are key terms, skills, and/or character traits.  You will frequently be asked to name your strengths, weaknesses, and abilities.  Or perhaps you just need to show them what you can offer their team.  If you Study Abroad, there are many helpful terms that can now be applied to you.  Some of those you might use include: Continue reading

“A Beginner’s Guide to Franglais”

For students studying in France (the most visited place in the world)

“A Beginner’s Guide to Franglais”

by Jessica Phalen via “Global Post

“PARIS, France — Do you want the good news or the bad news first?

The good news, at least for people who don’t speak French: You’ll hear lots of English in France. The bad news: You won’t understand it.

It looks like English. It sounds like English. Some of it really is English. But it doesn’t mean what you’d expect it to mean.

If Anglophones love to pilfer from other languages (pilfer: from the Old Frenchpelfrer), the French like to add their ownje ne sais quoi. No, really: without some help, you wouldn’t savoir quoi they’re on about.

In the spirit of mutual mistranslation, here’s a brief glossary of the weirdest “English” words you need a French dictionary to understand — not to mention a few bons mots we’ve adopted in English that just won’t fly in France.

 Un after-work (n). An event that takes place after work. Simple, effective, yet irremediably ugly.

Le baby-foot (n). Table football. I just… I don’t even know. . . . . .”

Study Abroad as a Language Requirement

“Study Abroad as a Language Requirement”

by Jacqueline Boyle via “Student Life

“Thousands of students each year choose to study abroad, with various motivations, but I wager if you were to ask language majors why they go abroad, the overwhelming majority would say, “I want to be able to speak the language.” It is a valid reason and a category I fell into before my time down in South America. The real importance, though, is the results: results that speak to the necessity of requiring all language majors to have spent time immersed in the culture and the language they wish to pursue.

When I am asked where I learned Spanish, I have some trouble. . . . “

What’s Your Opinion? Should traveling to a country that speaks your language be a requirement for language majors?

Random Question for You!

For those of you who have already traveled abroad before:

  • Name a country you’ve been to.
  • Name one overlooked word that you think travelers absolutely must know in the native language.  
  • Why that word?

My Example:

South Korea — 

While the most important word ever is “I’m Sorry” (Miahne), a lot of people already know that one. What they don’t mention is “Yok” (long o).  That’s “subway station”  in Korean and is used for everything in regards to directions.  Even the locals give directions in terms of which exit of the subway you should orient yourself to.  Lots of times you’ll be dropped off by taxis at the closest Yok to your destination.  It’s the one word you definitely need to know if you’re going to be in Korea, even for a day. But it’s rarely on the ‘most translated words’ lists.

Share Your Examples!