Book Review: “A Cheap Ticket For Student Travel”

“A Cheap Ticket for Student Travel”

by Gary Chen

A small little guide for the average college student on saving while they travel.

Gary Chen’s new book, “A Cheap Ticket for Student Travel” is a great, yet short, read for college/low income students interested in traveling (especially traveling abroad).  At only 23 pages (in PDF form), you can read through it pretty quickly, but it offers some great insights into how you can travel even on a college student’s budget.  

He opens with a pretty strong argument for traveling while you’re young ~ time, energy, and lack of ties.  This is something I wish a lot more students would keep in mind; by the time you have jobs, families, and other demands on your time and attention, traveling becomes less and less of a likelihood.  Since traveling can significantly add to both your accomplishments and the broadening of your experience, taking that awesome trip now is a pretty good idea.

Most of his advice officially starts in Chapter two, where he begins with the important saving tool – Planning.  This carries through the next two chapters during which he discusses how  even little things like grouping nearby locations together can save money on costs.  Chapter 5 is where he really gets into precise methods of saving as opposed to more general recommendations.  He also has a really great form on pages 17-18 that helps you list out your expected expenses and likely total.  I think filling this out is a great way of reminding yourself precisely how much this might cost you and what you need to save. Throughout the book, he offers some great means of saving and I like the main message he communicates — traveling doesn’t have to ruin you financially!

Writing style: Some of the writing could use some editing and there were a few choppy areas, but overall I found it to be a quick and easy read.  A great addition to the ebook is the number of internal links Chen offers his readers–he frequently links to relevant and interesting articles relating to the subject of discussion.  Particularly helpful are the links to discount sites and saving tools; I might even use a few of these!

If you are interested or thinking about traveling, I recommend checking his book out.  You can find it on Smashwords as a FREE E-book (I like the free part, it matches his theme 🙂 )

READ ON SMASHWORDS

“96 Travel Tips for a Student Budget”

“96 Travel Tips for a Student Budget”

by Kyle Owens via “GoOverseas.com”

backpackers in the backwoods

“College is a memorable time in your life where you can study, meet people and expand your cultural horizon. Why not take that one step further? As a student, you typically spend a lot of your time in the library or in the classroom, which doesn’t leave you too much time for fun. Now, many students empty their savings account and fly somewhere tropical for a spring break trip – but I’m here to tell you how to make those hard earned dollars take you even further (for even longer!). It’s very important to travel and learn about the world outside of your own; however, you don’t need to break your bank account in order to make that happen.

Typically, the cost for a person to buy a one-way ticket to another country is less than one thousand dollars. Now, once you’re there things are going to cost hundreds of dollars, right? Wrong! If you’re a frugal person (and most student travelers are), you can easily manage to fund a trip. You just have to know where to look – that’s where I come in. I have traveled pretty extensively as a student, so I know which corners to cut and which to keep. Who knows, maybe 1 or 2 of these 95 tips will even inspire you to book your own college trip and start traveling! Continue reading

“Guide to Green Stays, Eats, Play”

For the Eco-Friendly Student Traveler

“Guide to Green Stays, Eats, Play”

by John Harvey via “IOL Travel

“Cape Town – An initiative aimed at pointing people towards restaurants, accommodation establishments and other services that espouse eco-friendly practices is beginning to find favour among businesses.

Eco Atlas seeks to be an “all-inclusive ethical directory” to empower both locals and tourists to make informed choices.

Eco Atlas directs people to places where, . . . .”

 

“VisaMapper Is A Magical Map Where You Can See Which Countries Require Visas To Visit”

You can find a direct link to the VisaMapper app (and other tools) under “Student Resources” on the left side of this blog.

“VisaMapper Is A Magical Map Where You Can See Which Countries Require Visas To Visit”

by Suzy Strutner via “Huffington Post

“This might be the most brilliant thing a Reddit user has done in a while.

To curb the pain of the “do I need a visa?!” research headache, udit99 made a no-frills website called VisaMapper. Visitors select their nationality from a drop-down menu and instantly see, on a color-coded world map, which countries require a visa for them to visit and which don’t.

Tell VisaMapper you’re of Swedish citizenship, for example, and watch loads of nations on the map turn to happy shades of green. This color means you won’t need a visa to visit them. . . . .”

I will say that I can’t tell when the map applies. . . . Sometimes the rules are different for travelers staying longer than 90 days (or a similar length of time) which would often include students.  England I know has different requirements than I think this app shows.