“A Beginner’s Guide to Franglais”

For students studying in France (the most visited place in the world)

“A Beginner’s Guide to Franglais”

by Jessica Phalen via “Global Post

“PARIS, France — Do you want the good news or the bad news first?

The good news, at least for people who don’t speak French: You’ll hear lots of English in France. The bad news: You won’t understand it.

It looks like English. It sounds like English. Some of it really is English. But it doesn’t mean what you’d expect it to mean.

If Anglophones love to pilfer from other languages (pilfer: from the Old Frenchpelfrer), the French like to add their ownje ne sais quoi. No, really: without some help, you wouldn’t savoir quoi they’re on about.

In the spirit of mutual mistranslation, here’s a brief glossary of the weirdest “English” words you need a French dictionary to understand — not to mention a few bons mots we’ve adopted in English that just won’t fly in France.

 Un after-work (n). An event that takes place after work. Simple, effective, yet irremediably ugly.

Le baby-foot (n). Table football. I just… I don’t even know. . . . . .”

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Random Question for You!

For those of you who have already traveled abroad before:

  • Name a country you’ve been to.
  • Name one overlooked word that you think travelers absolutely must know in the native language.  
  • Why that word?

My Example:

South Korea — 

While the most important word ever is “I’m Sorry” (Miahne), a lot of people already know that one. What they don’t mention is “Yok” (long o).  That’s “subway station”  in Korean and is used for everything in regards to directions.  Even the locals give directions in terms of which exit of the subway you should orient yourself to.  Lots of times you’ll be dropped off by taxis at the closest Yok to your destination.  It’s the one word you definitely need to know if you’re going to be in Korea, even for a day. But it’s rarely on the ‘most translated words’ lists.

Share Your Examples!

 

“Traveler’s Lodestone” out in Hard Copy!

Celebrations abound! At last, “Traveler’s Lodestone” is officially out in hard copy — a great universal translator ready for use!

After a great deal of time and effort, we have put together this great resource for anyone working with foreign languages. Whether that be while traveling abroad or when dealing with non-native speakers in your own backyard.  “Traveler’s Lodestone”  is a point-to-speak book. It uses picture-based communications to cover the basic things a person would need when conversing in any foreign language. The idea is that when the words aren’t at the tip of your tongue, the pictures are at the tip of your finger. Everything from groceries to clothes to hotel amenities to weather, directions, and more is available instantly with this easy to use book. It’s quick and universal!

Right now it’s out on CreateSpace, but coming soon to Amazon and other booksellers near you. At 5×8 and 100 pages, it’s small enough to stick in your purse or bag and carry around, easy to pull out and use. Check out this great universal translator! Now tested in Korea, Japan, and China–it worked perfectly! (the Bathroom/Toilet pic is apparently very popular 😛 )  Trust me; I’ve tried the dictionaries, translation books, etc. and this is the best tool I’ve found so far.

Great for students abroad!

Pick up Your Paperback Copy By Clicking Here

If you are interested in the E-book Version, that’s available here.  The e-book is actually broken up into 3 short Volumes for easier use.

We’re also working on a Android/Apple app. As soon as I figure out how to attach buttons to links, we’ll be adding that.